For the Love of Knowledge.

neurosciencenews:

Researchers Find Neural Compensation in People with Alzheimer’s Related Protein
Read the full article Researchers Find Neural Compensation in People with Alzheimer’s Related Protein at NeuroscienceNews.com.
The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley researchers.
The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)
Research: “Neural compensation in older people with brain amyloid-β deposition” by Jeremy A Elman, Hwamee Oh, Cindee M Madison, Suzanne L Baker, Jacob W Vogel, Shawn M Marks, Sam Crowley, James P O’Neil and William J Jagust in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3806
Image: Shown are fMRI scans across all subjects in the study. The yellow and red areas in Section A represent parts of the brain that are activated while subjects are forming “gist memories” of pictures viewed. Section B represents areas of increased activation, shown in yellow and red, as detailed memories are being formed. Credit Jagust Lab.

neurosciencenews:

Researchers Find Neural Compensation in People with Alzheimer’s Related Protein

Read the full article Researchers Find Neural Compensation in People with Alzheimer’s Related Protein at NeuroscienceNews.com.

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley researchers.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Neural compensation in older people with brain amyloid-β deposition” by Jeremy A Elman, Hwamee Oh, Cindee M Madison, Suzanne L Baker, Jacob W Vogel, Shawn M Marks, Sam Crowley, James P O’Neil and William J Jagust in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3806

Image: Shown are fMRI scans across all subjects in the study. The yellow and red areas in Section A represent parts of the brain that are activated while subjects are forming “gist memories” of pictures viewed. Section B represents areas of increased activation, shown in yellow and red, as detailed memories are being formed. Credit Jagust Lab.

neurosciencenews:

A Link Between Jacobsen Syndrome and Autism
Read the full article A Link Between Jacobsen Syndrome and Autism at NeuroscienceNews.com.
SDSU psychologist Sarah Mattson was part of a recent study which found that symptoms of autism were unusually common in people with Jacobsen syndrome.
The research is in Genetics in Medicine. (full access paywall)
Research: “Evidence for autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome: identification of a candidate gene in distal 11q” by Natacha Akshoomoff PhD, Sarah N. Mattson PhD and Paul D. Grossfeld MD in Genetics in Medicine. doi:10.1038/gim.2014.86
Image: A deletion at one end of chromosome 11 is responsible for the rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome. Credit San Diego State University.

neurosciencenews:

A Link Between Jacobsen Syndrome and Autism

Read the full article A Link Between Jacobsen Syndrome and Autism at NeuroscienceNews.com.

SDSU psychologist Sarah Mattson was part of a recent study which found that symptoms of autism were unusually common in people with Jacobsen syndrome.

The research is in Genetics in Medicine. (full access paywall)

Research: “Evidence for autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome: identification of a candidate gene in distal 11q” by Natacha Akshoomoff PhD, Sarah N. Mattson PhD and Paul D. Grossfeld MD in Genetics in Medicine. doi:10.1038/gim.2014.86

Image: A deletion at one end of chromosome 11 is responsible for the rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome. Credit San Diego State University.

snfprtch:

ryanandmath:

How to read math. You’d be surprised how far this will get you.

this was literally the basis of part of Now Then Whatever, I just copied all the phrases on the right and made them into couplets early in the poem

(via fudgesmonkey)

“I have to go to the hospital? Well, I was just hoping you’d give me a water pill to make the swelling go down. Are you sure this is serious?”

—Severely edematous (swollen from fluid leaking out of her blood vessels into her soft tissues) and dyspneic (having trouble breathing) woman, proving that women can also Downplay the Symptoms.

And just for fun, I’ve put together a list of all the "serious" tests and interventions that this woman underwent after getting admitted to the hospital for what turned out to be severe Congestive Heart Failure + Pulmonary Hypertension, exacerbated by years of smoking and drinking:

  • Chest xrays (fluid on the lungs!)
  • Chest CAT scan (LOTS of fluid in the lungs!)
  • Chest and Heart Ultrasound (DAMN that’s a lot of fluid — and oh look, her heart is pumping at 1/5th of expected efficiency!)
  • Pleurocentesis (sticking a needle into the space between the lung and the ribcage to drain out fluid)
  • Ultrasound of her stomach (yep, fluid in there too!)
  • Abdominal Pericentesis (another day, another needle, another drainage)
  • Ultrasound of her veins and arteries in her legs and arms (them veins are in bad shape!)
  • Days of IV diuresis (to make her pee out all the extra liquid — after 4 days, 20 liters have left the building!)
  • Mechanical breathing support (until her lung fluid got emptied out)
  • Consults of pulmonologists, cardiologists, general surgeons, and vascular surgeons (to do all the procedures)

Guess I should’ve just sent her home with a water pill, huh? :)

(Source: cranquis, via fudgesmonkey)

scientific-women:

engrprof:

thegrapesofangst:

I made these for you! So this is my Science Follow Forever, just to thank all the science related blogs who have followed me or who I follow and who have taught me something I didn’t know, made me laugh with an amazing pun, or inspired me. 

adventuresinchemistry, biomedicalephemera, butylenemaid, chemistryandstuff, chroniclesofachemist, dumb-science-jokeseatgeekstudy, economicsofcuriosity, en-thalpy, engrprof, entrop-eghostly-smoke, just-chemistry-things,m3rcaptan, markruffalo, neuralcaffeinology, neurosciencestuff, passthecholoformscientific-women, shrat, shychemist, sweetteascience

Thank you everyone! I’ll be doing a non science one soon, as well!

This is awesome!
First time I’ve been in someone’s follow forever! I love these quotes and your blog!

Thank you!  How wonderful!

(via livinginchaosbeauty)

neurosciencestuff:

Speech processing while unconscious: Sleep inhibits action but not preparation and meaning
In a team effort between the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Cambridge, UK) and the Laboratory of Cognitive and Psycholinguistics Sciences, Ecole Normale Superiore (Paris), part of what we are capable of while sleeping has been unravelled.
People were asked to classify words belonging to one of two categories – animals or objects – by pressing buttons with the left or the right hand, and continued to do so until they have fallen asleep. Their brain activity indicated that they were able to decode the meaning of the words and intended to act but the unconscious state during sleep prevented them from responding (no movement of the fingers).
This result indicates that once a rule (animals press left/objects press right) is established during wakefulness it can still be implemented even during sleep. This means that the decoding networks in the brain process the spoken words and that information (if it is an animal or an object for instance) is passed to a motor plan signaling the intention and subsequent action. During sleep that action is inhibited (we do not purposefully move during sleep) but this study has found that the meaning extraction and subsequent action preparation remained but was slower and lasted longer.
To confirm this result a second study tested whether people could classify word or nonwords (like boat or foat). A similar pattern emerged, showing appropriate brain preparation activity for left or right button presses even if responses were inhibited by the sleep mechanisms.

neurosciencestuff:

Speech processing while unconscious: Sleep inhibits action but not preparation and meaning

In a team effort between the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (Cambridge, UK) and the Laboratory of Cognitive and Psycholinguistics Sciences, Ecole Normale Superiore (Paris), part of what we are capable of while sleeping has been unravelled.

People were asked to classify words belonging to one of two categories – animals or objects – by pressing buttons with the left or the right hand, and continued to do so until they have fallen asleep. Their brain activity indicated that they were able to decode the meaning of the words and intended to act but the unconscious state during sleep prevented them from responding (no movement of the fingers).

This result indicates that once a rule (animals press left/objects press right) is established during wakefulness it can still be implemented even during sleep. This means that the decoding networks in the brain process the spoken words and that information (if it is an animal or an object for instance) is passed to a motor plan signaling the intention and subsequent action. During sleep that action is inhibited (we do not purposefully move during sleep) but this study has found that the meaning extraction and subsequent action preparation remained but was slower and lasted longer.

To confirm this result a second study tested whether people could classify word or nonwords (like boat or foat). A similar pattern emerged, showing appropriate brain preparation activity for left or right button presses even if responses were inhibited by the sleep mechanisms.

numantinecitizen said: Congratulations! You will make a wonderful mother :)

Thank you, EJ!(:

Looks like baby Unity will be making his/her appearance in about 8 months or so, provided there are no complications.

I can’t believe it. I wasn’t supposed to be able to have children. I’m still in shock.

blamoscience:

mothernaturenetwork:

How ‘fake meat’ is madeEver wondered how food manufacturers get faux meat products to taste and feel like real meat? Here’s the science behind making ‘chick’n’ taste like chicken.

I’m not a vegetarian, but there are a lot of faux meat products that I just happen to enjoy. This article was an interesting read!

blamoscience:

mothernaturenetwork:

How ‘fake meat’ is made
Ever wondered how food manufacturers get faux meat products to taste and feel like real meat? Here’s the science behind making ‘chick’n’ taste like chicken.

I’m not a vegetarian, but there are a lot of faux meat products that I just happen to enjoy. This article was an interesting read!

smithandwesson65 said: I found you bye love your blog I almost chose to be a psychiatrist but change my mind but just message me

Ahhhhhhhhh I took so long to respond I suckkkkk. How are you?!

“If we have chosen the position in life in which we can most of all work for mankind, no burdens can bow us down, because they are sacrifices for the benefit of all; then we shall experience no petty, limited, selfish joy, but our happiness will belong to millions, our deeds will live on quietly but perpetually at work, and over our ashes will be shed the hot tears of noble people.”
17 year old Karl Marx in Reflections of a Young Man on the Choice of a Professionan essay Marx wrote for a high school final exam in 1935 (via levantineviper)

(Source: levantineviper-archive, via numantinecitizen)

theatlantic:


This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

(via rivernursed)

neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Aggressor cells, which have the potential to cause autoimmunity, are targeted by treatment, causing conversion of these cells to protector cells. Gene expression changes gradually at each stage of treatment, as illustrated by the color changes in this series of heat maps. Credit: University of Bristol/Dr. Bronwen Burton)
Scientists discover how to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases
Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue.
Rather than the body’s immune system destroying its own tissue by mistake, researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how cells convert from being aggressive to actually protecting against disease.
The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust, is published in Nature Communications.
It’s hoped this latest insight will lead to the widespread use of antigen-specific immunotherapy as a treatment for many autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes, Graves’ disease and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
MS alone affects around 100,000 people in the UK and 2.5 million people worldwide.
Scientists were able to selectively target the cells that cause autoimmune disease by dampening down their aggression against the body’s own tissues while converting them into cells capable of protecting against disease.
This type of conversion has been previously applied to allergies, known as ‘allergic desensitisation’, but its application to autoimmune diseases has only been appreciated recently.
The Bristol group has now revealed how the administration of fragments of the proteins that are normally the target for attack leads to correction of the autoimmune response.
Most importantly, their work reveals that effective treatment is achieved by gradually increasing the dose of antigenic fragment injected.
In order to figure out how this type of immunotherapy works, the scientists delved inside the immune cells themselves to see which genes and proteins were turned on or off by the treatment.
They found changes in gene expression that help explain how effective treatment leads to conversion of aggressor into protector cells. The outcome is to reinstate self-tolerance whereby an individual’s immune system ignores its own tissues while remaining fully armed to protect against infection.
By specifically targeting the cells at fault, this immunotherapeutic approach avoids the need for the immune suppressive drugs associated with unacceptable side effects such as infections, development of tumours and disruption of natural regulatory mechanisms.
Professor David Wraith, who led the research, said: “Insight into the molecular basis of antigen-specific immunotherapy opens up exciting new opportunities to enhance the selectivity of the approach while providing valuable markers with which to measure effective treatment. These findings have important implications for the many patients suffering from autoimmune conditions that are currently difficult to treat.”
This treatment approach, which could improve the lives of millions of people worldwide, is currently undergoing clinical development through biotechnology company Apitope, a spin-out from the University of Bristol.

neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Aggressor cells, which have the potential to cause autoimmunity, are targeted by treatment, causing conversion of these cells to protector cells. Gene expression changes gradually at each stage of treatment, as illustrated by the color changes in this series of heat maps. Credit: University of Bristol/Dr. Bronwen Burton)

Scientists discover how to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases

Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue.

Rather than the body’s immune system destroying its own tissue by mistake, researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how cells convert from being aggressive to actually protecting against disease.

The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust, is published in Nature Communications.

It’s hoped this latest insight will lead to the widespread use of antigen-specific immunotherapy as a treatment for many autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes, Graves’ disease and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

MS alone affects around 100,000 people in the UK and 2.5 million people worldwide.

Scientists were able to selectively target the cells that cause autoimmune disease by dampening down their aggression against the body’s own tissues while converting them into cells capable of protecting against disease.

This type of conversion has been previously applied to allergies, known as ‘allergic desensitisation’, but its application to autoimmune diseases has only been appreciated recently.

The Bristol group has now revealed how the administration of fragments of the proteins that are normally the target for attack leads to correction of the autoimmune response.

Most importantly, their work reveals that effective treatment is achieved by gradually increasing the dose of antigenic fragment injected.

In order to figure out how this type of immunotherapy works, the scientists delved inside the immune cells themselves to see which genes and proteins were turned on or off by the treatment.

They found changes in gene expression that help explain how effective treatment leads to conversion of aggressor into protector cells. The outcome is to reinstate self-tolerance whereby an individual’s immune system ignores its own tissues while remaining fully armed to protect against infection.

By specifically targeting the cells at fault, this immunotherapeutic approach avoids the need for the immune suppressive drugs associated with unacceptable side effects such as infections, development of tumours and disruption of natural regulatory mechanisms.

Professor David Wraith, who led the research, said: “Insight into the molecular basis of antigen-specific immunotherapy opens up exciting new opportunities to enhance the selectivity of the approach while providing valuable markers with which to measure effective treatment. These findings have important implications for the many patients suffering from autoimmune conditions that are currently difficult to treat.”

This treatment approach, which could improve the lives of millions of people worldwide, is currently undergoing clinical development through biotechnology company Apitope, a spin-out from the University of Bristol.

(via fudgesmonkey)